My heart became hot within me. As I mused, the fire burned; then I spoke with my tongue: "O Lord, make me know my end and what is the measure of my days; let me know how fleeting I am!"

14 November 2005

Presbytery went well, and quickly. There's been a trend in recent years to make the younger members of the court the moderator - by current calculations, I might be up for the gig in another year. I hope the trend shifts; I'm not entirely familiar or comfortable with Robert's Rules and running big meetings. But I'd be happy to serve.

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Did some reading in my architecture-review book yesterday. As the author was gushing over the ancient Indian culture (not American Indian), he commented on how the inside of the buildings are really pretty dark and unfulfilling, that most of the splendor of ancient Indian architecture is on the outside. Several chapters earlier, he had written at length about the high gothic cathedrals of the middle ages; those cathedrals were designed to be monuments of light, with walls and walls of stained glass windows and clever ways to catch the light at different parts of the day.

Then last night our Australian intern (really, who else gets to write those words?) preached from Luke 12, where Jesus rebukes the Pharisees & lawyers for being whitewashed tombs. The difference between Indian temples and gothic churches is a wonderful illustration of Christ's teaching. From a distance, they both have beauty and magnificence. But on the inside, it is the ancient churches which are full of light and beauty. Hindu temples are, on the inside, dark and undecorated, concerned only with the impressiveness of the outside.

The outside, visible part of our lives is to be beautiful. But if that beauty doesn't begin with Christ's light shining in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of the glory of God, it is only so much whitewash on a temple to another god.

7 comments:

Josh said...

It really is interesting how Christ's influence on our lives affects us in so many ways, especially the creative process. I have come to understand that more and more lately as I've tried to understand more what it's like to be a Christian and the role we play in the arts. Even though it's more about music, I suggest reading "Imagine" by Steve Turner. It was published this year through InterVarsity press. It's a really good book on the role of Christians in the arts.

Tamara Rose said...

nice post... now come on! didn't you read my comments! please please!??!? :)

Stephen Roberts said...

Who was the moderator?

Jared said...

the moderator was none other than James Faris, associate pastor at 2nd RP in Indy. He did a fine job cracking the whip to keep us on task.

James I. Faris said...

That last sentence on the topic of the moderator sounds a bit like a campaign speech to me.

Catherine said...

That's a really interesting insight about the contrast between the Indian temples and Christian cathedrals. I think sometimes the modern church doesn't give enough thought to what our PLACE of worship says about what we believe (not that I think we need to go back to the smells and bells routine, just that we should think about what our surroundings say about our faith).

Youth Pastor Justin said...

Hey bud... I always thought that about Buddhist temples as well. Pretty on the outside, but the insides are so plain, so bare, so empty, so devoid of life as to show what an empty faith they have.

Anyway, I was reading up on Lectio Divina today, thinking about using it for my senior highers, and wondered if you've heard of it or what you thought about it:

http://www.valyermo.com/ld-art.html