My heart became hot within me. As I mused, the fire burned; then I spoke with my tongue: "O Lord, make me know my end and what is the measure of my days; let me know how fleeting I am!"

17 November 2005

Music - Keb' Mo'

Little while back, Martin Scorcese produced a series of short films on the blues, with each film being headed up by a different director (Clint Eastwood is probably the most famous of the group). To go along with this massive production, he oversaw the publication of a book and a boxset overview of the blues, as well as a series of CDs highlighting great songs from different artist's careers. This CD by Kevin Moore (Keb' Mo') falls into the latter category.

If you're still holding off on jumping back on the blues bandwagon - yeah, I see that hand in the back - Moore might be your gateway drug into one of America's great musical forms.

Though I have known his name for a while, this is the first album we've owned of Keb' Mo'. I bought it because it was slightly cheaper than some of the others and seemed like a good way to get an introduction - and I was, surprisingly, right. It is an excellent cd, showing off Moore's great abilities as a singer and guitar player. It's a great mix of acoustic and slightly-electric blues, of original material and covers.

Moore has a wonderful cover of "Come on in My Kitchen" by the famous Robert Johnson. He also shows off his songwriting talent on "Perpetual Blues Machine": When I found out you were a fake, you ran up and bit me like a snake; and I wasn't ready to let go, to let all my feelings show - why you wanna be so cold? You gone and let your true colors show, you're a perpetual blues machine. This song makes me smile.

There's some gospel-style blues ("Don't Try to Explain"), some country blues ("Love in Vain"), some funky blues ("Am I Wrong?"), some Chicago blues ("I'm on Your Side"), and some pretty smooth blues ("Henry" - maybe the best song on the album). In fact, there's enough here to give you a great introduction, not just to Keb' Mo', but to the blues in general. Moore's voice is easy to listen to, his playing is always appropriate to the song, but usually has enough of a twist to keep us interested.

Really, really good stuff.

7 comments:

Jared said...

Sorry I can't make this post look right, but I'm done messing with it.

Jared

Andy W. said...

I loved Keb'Mo's first two CDs but am thinking of selling his third and fourth ones if you want them... I believe one is called "The Door" and the other "Slow Down." Not bad, I just never listen to them anymore.

My favorite songs have always been "Angelina" and "Don't Try to Explain." He is definitely one of my favorite blues singers.

Joe said...

mmm blues.... wish I knew more, wish I had more, slowly going to add....

Tamara Rose said...

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Father Josh said...

I have had Keb's first 3 albums for several years... All solid are pretty solid, especially the first 2. His newer stuff that I don't have is still strong and a good representation of blues' next generation.

Josh said...

I realize that my collections lacks BIG TIME as the likes of Keb Mo are non-existant. I've been wanting to expand in another direction. This sounds good. Thank you my soul-brutha!

Erica said...

I just caught wind of an event that just happened last night in DC. This "Pray for Peace" included performances by Graham Nash, David Crosby, Jackson Browne, and others. A local radio station has pics, video and audio from the event. Check it out at www.idigbig.com.